Friday (06-December-2019) — New Jersey

Backyard Night Time Nature in New Jersey.

Bunny Rabbit on the patio (infrared video).

Daily Electric Energy Used (80.9 kWh) from Sense and Daily Solar Electric Energy Produced (17.4 kWh) from SolSystems and Locus Energy. Overall a net deficit of 63.5 kWh.

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Saturday (30-November-2019) — New Jersey

Backyard Nature at Night.

Cat, mouse, and rabbit on my patio — all caught on an infrared video camera.

Daily Electric Energy Used (83.0 kWh) from Sense and Daily Solar Electric Energy Produced (27.9 kWh) from SolSystems and Locus Energy.  The day started sunny, then the clouds came in. Overall a net deficit of 55.1 kWh.

Monthly Electric Energy Used (2144 kWh) from Sense and Daily Solar Electric Energy Produced (734 kWh) from SolSystems and Locus Energy. Overall a net deficit of 1410 kWh. Although this means I will need to pay a power bill to PSE&G this month, I am getting SREC credits that will cover the expense.

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Monday (11-November-2019) — New Jersey

Outdoor Nighttime Autumn Nature in New Jersey

Nocturnal Rabbit.

Daily Electric Energy Used (67.4 kWh) from Sense and Daily Solar Electric Energy Produced (29.1 kWh) from SolSystems and Locus Energy. More sun, not as cold. Overall a net deficit of 38.3 kWh. I’ve run out of credits for the excess electric energy produced this summer, so will be paying an electric bill this month.

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Eleven-Years Ago (30-August-2008) — New Jersey

Backyard Summertime Nature in New Jersey.

Harvey, my outdoor rabbit posing for some portraits. Images taken with a Nikon D300 camera and 80-400 mm VR lens. It was getting late and the amount of light was going down, so I was pushing the ISO higher. Images reprocessed with the new standalone Topaz Denoise AI program to remove the background noise. In the past I mainly used the NIK Define filter to reduce the noise level in high ISO images. For troublesome noisey images (especially jpg images) I would use a previous version of the Topaz Denoise filter.

Harvey the Rabbit. Image taken with a Nikon D300 camera and 80-400 mm VR lens (ISO 1600, 400 mm, f/5.6, 1/60 sec). (David J Mathre)
Harvey the Rabbit. Image taken with a Nikon D300 camera and 80-400 mm VR lens (ISO 1600, 400 mm, f/5.6, 1/60 sec). (David J Mathre)
Harvey the Rabbit. Image taken with a Nikon D300 camera and 80-400 mm VR lens (ISO 2800, 280 mm, f/8, 1/250 sec). (David J Mathre)
Harvey the Rabbit. Image taken with a Nikon D300 camera and 80-400 mm VR lens (ISO 2800, 280 mm, f/8, 1/250 sec). (David J Mathre)

 

Thirteen-Years Ago (24-August-2006) — New Jersey

Backyard Summertime Nature in New Jersey.

Lone Rabbit. Image taken with a Nikon D200 camera and 80-400 mm VR lens (ISO 100, 400 mm, f/5.6, 1/10 sec). The ninth image taken with the camera. Not a very good image, but it does show that the vibration reduction (VR) helps since this was hand-held with a relatively long (1/10 sec) exposure.  Below are the original jpg image, an updated version from 2010, an updated version using current tools (2019). For the current version  the image was first converted from jpg (8 bit) to a tif (16 bit) file with Topaz JPG to RAW AI, and processed using Capture One Pro. I then attempted to sharpen the rabbit with Focus Magic (motion blur) and Topaz Sharpen AI (stabilize). Not perfect, but much better than the original.

 (David Mathre)
Lone Rabbit. Image taken with a Nikon D200 and 80-400 mm VR lens (ISO 100, 400 mm, f/5.6, 1/10 sec). Original jpg image. (David Mathre)
Lone Rabbit. Image taken with a Nikon D200 and 80-400 mm VR lens (ISO 100, 400 mm, f/5.6, 1/10 sec). (David J Mathre)
Lone Rabbit. Image taken with a Nikon D200 and 80-400 mm VR lens (ISO 100, 400 mm, f/5.6, 1/10 sec). Processed with tools available in 2010. (David J Mathre)
 (David Mathre)
Lone Rabbit. Image taken with a Nikon D200 and 80-400 mm VR lens (ISO 100, 400 mm, f/5.6, 1/10 sec). Processed with tools available in 2019. (David Mathre)
 (David Mathre)
Lone Rabbit. Image taken with a Nikon D200 and 80-400 mm VR lens (ISO 100, 400 mm, f/5.6, 1/10 sec). Original jpg image cropped. (David Mathre)
 (David Mathre)
Lone Rabbit. Image taken with a Nikon D200 and 80-400 mm VR lens (ISO 100, 400 mm, f/5.6, 1/10 sec). Processed with current tools (2019) and motion blur removed with Focus Magic. (David Mathre)
 (David Mathre)
Lone Rabbit. Image taken with a Nikon D200 and 80-400 mm VR lens (ISO 100, 400 mm, f/5.6, 1/10 sec). Processed with current tools (2019) and Topaz Sharpen AI – stabilize. (David Mathre)

Today is my thirteenth anniversary of using a DSLR camera. I have made many mistakes, and learned a lot since then. Over this time I have taken over 2 MM images. I save everything, and continually review the bad images and failed compositions to become a better photographer. Part of the reason I go back and review images taken on each day of the year. Initially, I only used Nikon DSLR cameras (D200, D300 (2x), D700, D800, D810a, D850, D2xs (2x), D3 (2x), D3s, D3x, D4, Df, and D5). More recently I have been using smaller mirrorless cameras Nikon (N1-V1, N1-V2, and N1-V3 (2x)), Leica (X1, X2, T (2x), TL2, CL), and Fuji (X-T1 (2x) X-T2, X-T3, X-H1). Of these, only two failed — Nikon Df (shutter sleeves buckled while in Antarctica, subsequently repaired), and one of the Fuji X-T1 (water damage while visiting Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe, not repairable). Some of the cameras my brothers, sisters, nephews, and nieces are using. I have also used a large collection of lenses (macro, prime, zoom, telephoto, perspective control, fish-eye). Recently, I have been trying out some 360 degree panorama cameras.

For the initial trip across the US with the D200 camera I had the kit 18-70 mm lens and the 80-400 mm telephoto zoom lens. I didn’t know how to use the camera, and the manual wasn’t much help. Somehow, I got some great images during the trip and became hooked on photography as my new passion. I have always been the type of person that has to learn and become an expert of something new every few years. I’ve had many great mentors to guide me, and have been on many photo related trips. I’ve had cameras with me on every one of my Semester at Sea voyages, visiting over 50 countries. Now that I am retired from corporate America, I can spend my time with photography and travel. I probably am not going to buy new cameras and lenses as often – and believe that “the best camera is the one that is with you”.