Friday (12-October-2018) — New Jersey

Home Renovation Project: Back Patio.

The remnants of Hurricane Michael blew through last night with about 0.45 inches (11 mm) of rain. The temperature dropped to the mid 60’s, and this morning the sky was clear with a bright sun. Today may be the first day this month that my solar panels generate more electricity that I use.  Alan and Lincoln installed the railings for the rear door landing to the patio. Still more to do, but the project is getting a lot closer to being complete. While they were working on the railings I mowed the lawn, and got some pictures of a Monarch Butterfly in my Zinnia patch.

Garmin VIRB-360 Time-Lapse Video (360 degree panorama, little planet, tunnel view) 720p 24p.


Individual images in the slideshow can be viewed here.

Five-Years Ago (07-October-2013) — Arizona

Gone to See America 2013. Nikonian Annual Photography Adventure Trip. Day 2: Gold King Mine and Ghost Town.

After Jerome, we visited the “tourist attraction” of Gold King Mine and Ghost Town. Or how to make money off a dump. Lots of derelict old cars and mining equipment, along with displays for paying tourists visiting a ghost town. It even boasts an old-time desert rat riding a Harley Davidson (for a fee).

Gold King Mine and Ghost Town. Junk Yard and Tourist Trap. Image taken with a Nikon D800 camera and 35 mm f/1.4 lens. (David J Mathre)
Gold King Mine and Ghost Town. Junk Yard and Tourist Trap. Image taken with a Nikon D800 camera and 35 mm f/1.4 lens. (David J Mathre)
No Peein" Sign and Water Bottles at Gold King Mine and Ghost Town near Jerome, Arizona. Image taken with a Nikon 1 V2 camera and 32 mm f/1.2 lens (ISO 160, 32 mm, f/2.2, 1/320 sec). Nikonians ANPAT 13. (David J Mathre)
No Peein” Sign and Water Bottles at Gold King Mine and Ghost Town. Image taken with a Nikon 1 V2 camera and 32 mm f/1.2 lens (ISO 160, 32 mm, f/2.2, 1/320 sec). (David J Mathre)


Political Message at Gold King Mine and Ghost Town. Junk Yard and Tourist Trap. Image taken with a Nikon D800 camera and 35 mm f/1.4 lens. (David J Mathre)
Political Message at Gold King Mine and Ghost Town. Junk Yard and Tourist Trap. Image taken with a Nikon D800 camera and 35 mm f/1.4 lens. (David J Mathre)


Kavanaugh Supporter Having a Beer. Image taken with a Nikon 1 V2 camera and 18.5 mm f/2 lens (David J Mathre)
Nikonian Kavanaugh Supporter Having a Beer. Image taken with a Nikon 1 V2 camera and 18.5 mm f/2 lens (David J Mathre)

Five-Years Ago (07-October-2013) — Arizona

Gone to See America 2013. Nikonian Annual Photography Adventure Trip. Day 2: Jerome.

Our van spent the morning in Jerome, a historic copper mining town. We then spent some time at the nearby King Mine and Ghost Town.  The mines are no longer active, with tourism supporting the economy of the region.

Caduceus Cellars and Merkin Vinyards Sign in Jerome, Arizona. Image taken with a Nikon 1 V2 camera and 32 mm f/1.2 lens (ISO 160, 32 mm, f/2.5, 1/400 sec). (David J Mathre)
Caduceus Cellars and Merkin Vinyards Sign in Jerome, Arizona. Image taken with a Nikon 1 V2 camera and 32 mm f/1.2 lens (ISO 160, 32 mm, f/2.5, 1/400 sec). (David J Mathre)
Simplex E-7 Movie Projector. Jerome, Arizona. Gone to See America 2013. Image taken with a Nikon 1 V2 camera and 32mm f/1.2 lens (ISO 160, 32 mm, f/4.5, 1/1250 sec). Image processed and converted to B&W with Capture One Pro 7. Nikonians ANPAT-13. (David J Mathre)
Simplex E-7 Movie Projector. Jerome, Arizona. Gone to See America 2013. Image taken with a Nikon 1 V2 camera and 32mm f/1.2 lens (ISO 160, 32 mm, f/4.5, 1/1250 sec). (David J Mathre)
Gallery Sign on a Rusted Wall in Jerome, Arizona. Image taken with a Nikon 1 V2 camera and 32 mm f/1.2 lens (ISO 160, 32 mm, f/4, 1/1000 sec). Nikonians ANPAT 13. (David J Mathre)
Gallery Sign on a Rusted Wall in Jerome, Arizona. Image taken with a Nikon 1 V2 camera and 32 mm f/1.2 lens (ISO 160, 32 mm, f/4, 1/1000 sec). Nikonians (David J Mathre)

Ten-Years Ago (06-October-2008) — California

Gone to See America October 2008 Road Trip. Eighth Annual Nikonian Photography Adventure Trip. Day 2: Bodie State Historic Park.

After breakfast at the Whoa Nellie Deli in Lee Vining, our van went to Bodie State Historic Park. This is a Gold Mining Ghost Town. California  maintains the park in a state of arrested decay. It is a favorite location for photographers, and a site for  filming movies. The van from the group that visited the day before had issues with one of the park rangers, so we departed before closing time (17:00) — even though the sun hadn’t set.

School Marm's Hat. Bodie State Park in California. Image taken with a Nikon D300 and 200 mm f/2 lens (ISO 200, 200 mm, f/4, 1/320). (David J Mathre)
School Marm’s Hat. Bodie State Park in California. Image taken with a Nikon D300 and 200 mm f/2 lens (ISO 200, 200 mm, f/4, 1/320). (David J Mathre)
Bodie Panorama. Composite of twenty images taken with a Nikon D300 camera and 200 mm f/2 lens. (David J Mathre)
Bodie Panorama. Composite of twenty images taken with a Nikon D300 camera and 200 mm f/2 lens. (David J Mathre)




Individual images from the slideshows can be viewed here.

Wednesday (26-September-2018) — New Jersey

Backyard Autumn Nature in New Jersey.

Today, I continued evaluating a Garmin VIRB 360 degree camera. The first thing that I like about this camera is that it has external control buttons, and a small LCD screen on the top to display the camera settings. The other cameras that I am looking at all require a smartphone or tablet for set-up and use. The Garmin camera also has a rechargeable battery that can be swapped out with a fresh battery. Two of the other cameras only have internal batteries. The Garmin camera can also be run with an external power supply connected to the micro USB connection port for shoots lasting more than 1 1/2 hours.

I initially set the camera up on my patio to do interval shots for a time-lapse video. In the camera (photo) mode you can set the interval time ( 2, 5, 10, 30, and 60 sec). There is no setting for duration, which presumably means the camera continues to take images until the battery (power) runs out, the memory card is full, or the run is manually stopped. The camera also has an option to change the lens mode (360 degrees, forward lens, rear lens, and raw). The 360 degree mode provides an in-camera stitched 360 degree panorama image. The forward and rear lens modes provide a geometrically corrected 16:9 image from the front or rear lens. The raw mode provides separate fisheye images from the front and rear lenses. It should be noted that raw does not mean that the image is in a RAW format. All of the images are JPG format.

Garmin VIRB 360 – Out of the Camera JPG – Panorama View (1080p 24p)

The time-lapse video was created using Photoshop CC with no adjustments. The camera is automatically controlling the exposure, and white balance. The clouds are a bit blown out, and shadow areas a bit dark. I then connected an external power source which you can see in the next two short time-lapse videos while I am working on the garden in the patio. One converted to a “Little Planet” view and the other a “Tunnel View” using Photoshop CC.

Garmin VIRB 360 – Out of the Camera JPG – Little Planet View (1080p 10p)

Garmin VIRB 360 – Out of the Camera JPG – Tunnel View (1080p 10p)

I then left the camera running for the rest of the afternoon into the evening to see how long the external battery (GoalZero, Venture 30) would last. The camera was still running and taking pictures after 6 hours. For these time-lapse videos, I processed the images with Capture One Pro to decrease the blown out areas, and increase the shadow areas. This did take a lot of processing time.

Garmin VIRB 360 – Capture One Pro – Panorama View (1080p 60p)

Garmin VIRB 360 – Capture One Pro – Little Planet View (1080p 60p)

Garmin VIRB 360 – Capture One Pro – Tunnel View (1080p 60p)