David Mathre Photography

Welcome to my Images of the Day Photo blog. My goal is to post images from each day of the year going back to 2006 when I got my first DSLR camera. Images I post on Google+ are also forwarded to this Photo blog. I am a retired chemist that worked nearly thirty years in the Pharmaceutical industry. I took my first DSLR camera on a road trip across the United States, and became hooked, with my new passion becoming a photographer. I now spend all my time traveling and taking pictures. Since then I have visited over 50 countries, many on Semester at Sea voyages. My photographic interests include travel, the natural world, landscapes, and photographic techniques. I always want to learn something new and the only way to become better is to learn from mistakes.

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Today — New Jersey

Monarch Butterfly on a Thistle Bloom. Summer Nature at the Sourland Mountain Preserve in New Jersey. Image taken with a Nikon D810a camera and 80-400 mm VRII lens (ISO 200, 400 mm, f/5.6, 1/1250 sec).

Over the last two weeks I only saw three Monarch butterflies, and only got an image of one. Today, I saw at least ten and was very happy. In addition to the Monarch butterflies, I also saw many Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterflies, Black Swallowtail butterflies (two or three varieties), Great Spangled Fritillary butterflies, Clearwing Moths (two varieties), Dragonflies, and Robberflies. All in all the best day this season. I am going to be up late tonight processing more images…

#Animalia (+Animalia) created & managed by +Adelphe BACHELET

3 Responses to “Today — New Jersey”

  1. Beautiful photo and glad you're seeing more monarchs. We're really starting to see lots of caterpillars here on our milkweed.

  2. David Mathre David Mathre says:

    +William Parmley I was getting worried, and yesterday very happy seeing at least 10 Monarchs. There have been hundreds of the Eastern Tiger Swallowtails. At the Sourland Mountain Preserve there is plenty of Milkweed. Unfortunately, the Milkweed that I planted in my yard has all been eaten by the local deer.

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